A Brief History of Champagne

A Brief History of Champagne

If you’re celebrating with champagne for an anniversary, Valentine’s Day, or any other occasion, why not pleasantly surprise your company by knowing the history of this beloved drink? For example, did you know that champagne was really red and flat for most of its existence? Yet, we now know it as white and oh-so-bubbly. Champagne is more interesting than you may think. The bubbly goodness has a vast history as it’s been enjoyed for many generations. 
 
We have the Romans to thank for the very origins of champagne; they were the first group to plant vineyards in northeast France, where most grapes used in champagne are now grown. Then, in 987, Hugh Capet, the then King of France, started a tradition that included displaying wine in an elaborate way during coronation banquets. There proved to many challenged for growing grapes for red wine in this northern area, and this led the people to search for alternatives and innovations.
 
For many reasons, the pressure inside the weak early wine bottles of France caused many bottles of wine to explode. The Champenois considered the bubbles in the bottles that remained in tact to mean that the wine was faulty. Even in the late 1600s, people in the region were still trying to make sure that their wines didn’t have bubbles. Meanwhile, however, English people were cultivating quite a taste for bubbly wines.
 
Many changes were in place throughout the tastes of the public and the wine industries. The current versions of champagne as we know and love them were starting to be made on a large scale and were much beloved in the 19th century, and champagne is now synonymous with partying, royalty, celebrations, and good times.